Scientist shows global warming effect on greenhouse gas emissions in paddy soils

https://phys.org/news/2020-12-scientist-global-effect-greenhouse-gas.html

A soil scientist from RUDN University studied the decomposition of organic matter in rice paddies—the sources of CO2 and methane emissions. Both gases add to the greenhouse effect and affect climate warming in subtropical regions. The emissions increase when the roots of plants influence microbial communities in the soil. This influence, in turn, depends on temperature changes. Therefore, climate warming can lead to more greenhouse gas emissions. The results of the study were published inApplied Soil Ecology. The intensity of this process depends on the temperature of the environment and soil microorganisms. In the soils of rice paddies, methane is produced by single-cell organisms called archaea. However, to make methane, they require intermediary substances that come from plant roots. This is how the so-called priming effect occurs: the life of microorganisms is supported by organic substances released by plants through their roots. It is this effect that determines the number and activity of microorganisms in the soil. A soil scientist from RUDN University was the first to discover a correlation between the priming effect and greenhouse gas emissions and to describe the dynamics of these processes in view of global warming.


Original Title: Scientist shows global warming effect on greenhouse gas emissions in paddy soils

Full Text of the Original Article: https://phys.org/news/2020-12-scientist-global-effect-greenhouse-gas.html